Non jew dating jewish man

Despite the insistence of the early rabbis that converts are to be treated as if they had always been Jewish, for many people a converted woman will always carry with her a shiksa stigma.And, to my surprise, the stigma of being a shiksa is profound.My wife and I have several Jewish female friends in their mid-30s who are still single.When any of them visit, our Shabbat talk inevitably turns to the people they are dating and how difficult it is to find a nice Jewish guy with whom to start a Jewish family and raise Jewish children.In the Talmud, interfaith marriage is completely prohibited, although the definition of interfaith is not so simply expressed.The Biblical position on exogamous marriage is somewhat ambiguous; that is, except in relation to intermarriage with a Canaanite, which the majority of the Israelite patriarchs are depicted as criticising.One unpartnered friend, a rabbi, actually flew to Israel for in vitro fertilization and is now pregnant. "But since I'm getting older and haven't found a soul-mate yet, I'm going to start my own family." These Jewishly involved single women could have other options, but those aren't sanctioned by the Jewish community. It is time to remove the stigma from dating and marrying non-Jewish men.

non jew dating jewish man-72non jew dating jewish man-10non jew dating jewish man-47non jew dating jewish man-81

We joked on the way home that she had almost gone through life with "shiksa toes." But, in a way, all women who convert do still go through life with "shiksa toes" because, for many Jews, a gentile woman can never really change--even after religious conversion.

Countless sermons have been wasted on this topic, and its specter has launched numerous fund-raising campaigns for institutions that usually have little clue on how to creatively adapt to a changing community.

As a result, many of our Jewish leaders and even major philanthropists are finding that their grandchildren are not necessarily being raised Jewishly.

I stopped joking about my wife's toes when I found out that the word "shiksa" is a Yiddish term of disgust derived from the biblical Hebrew word shakaytz, meaning "to abominate an unclean thing." The female form is infinitely more common than its masculine form, "shaygets," but this lopsidedness only adds to this unpleasant reminder of sexism.

Christine Benvenuto, a journalist living in Amherst, Mass., claims that the term is still in full, vitriolic use.

Leave a Reply